A printable list of Spanish rhymes for kids to greet each other and use when playing.

My students have lots of fun playing and experimenting with rhyme. Spanish rhymes are easy to make and recognize, partly because of verb forms: habló, bailó, cantó, hablando, bailando, cantando, etc.

Playing with Spanish rhymes, children explore the mechanics of language. They find out how language works and become familiar with the relationship between sounds and letters – information that helps them decode the sounds that make up words when they are reading.

Playing with Spanish rhymes also helps build vocabulary and develop sound discrimination. Both skills are crucial to the development of strong literacy skills.

In Spanish, there are lots of rhyming phrases that children use to greet each other and when they are playing. They are fun to say and an excellent way to practice pronunciation and rhythm. Spanish rhymes like ¡Hola, Crayola! ¡Adios, carita de arroz! are some of the first spontaneous interactions in Spanish that I hear between students. These are some of the most common phrases. You can download a printable list below.

– Hola, hola, coca cola.
– Hola, crayola.
– Hola, cacerola.
– Hola, caracola.
– Hola, radiola.
– Hola, hola ratón sin (con) cola.
– Hola Manola, ratón sin cola.
– ¿Qué te pasa, calabaza?  Nada nada, limonada.
– Estoy feliz como una lombriz.
– Zapatito roto, cuéntame otro.
– Estoy más a gusto que un arbusto.
– Te conozco, mosco.
– Bien dicho, bicho.
– A otra cosa, mariposa (to move on to the next subject or activity).
– Eso eso, pan con queso.
– ¿A dónde vas Conejo Blas? (originally from a song by Cri-Cri, Francisco Gabilondo Soler)
– ¿Qué te parece, trece?
– Me extraña, araña.
– No sé, José.
– Te explico, Federico.
– En fin, Serafín.
– Ya te digo Rodrigo.
– Ay qué risa, Tía Felisa.
– De nada, empanada.
– Hasta la vista, turista.
– Vete, filete.
– Adiós, granito de arroz.
– Adiós, carita de arroz.
– Adiós, corazón de arroz.
– ¡Chaoito, pescadito!
– Ciao, bacalao.

Several of these Spanish rhymes are based on the word hola.  Children use them to greet each other and say them with enthusiasm and affection. Other rhyming phrases are based on common expressions like bien dicho (Bien dicho, bicho), or ¿que te parece? (¿Qué te parece, trece?).

I do an activity where kids complete the rhyme by adding the final letters of the second rhyming word. I do another activity with the two parts of the rhymes on cards and kids match them. I’ll share those later in the week.

Spanish Rhymes for Kids: A Printable List

Spanish Rhymes – Fun Phrases

Of course, there are lots of other fun rhymes to teach kids learning Spanish. Try these jump rope rhymes or these simple color poems.

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